Registration, Intake & Emergency Services

Adult Crisis Stabilization Program also known as the Adult Inpatient Unit (AIU)

The adult crisis stabilization unit provides continuous 24-hour observation and supervision for adults eighteen (18) years of age and older with an urgent/emergent needs who are a harm to themselves, a harm to others, or gravely disabled. The adult crisis stabilization program provides crisis stabilization services in a safe, structured setting. The unit provides crisis interventions necessary to stabilize and restore the person to a level of functioning which requires a less restrictive level of care. 



 

Adult Crisis Stabilization Program Offering:
  • Intake
  • Assessments and evaluations
  • Individualized treatment planning based on the individual’s strengths, needs, abilities, and preferences
  • Medication management (Prescriptions and monitoring)
  • Psycho-education/education on wellness and recovery (Education on the persons mental health issues and coping skills)
  • Group therapy (Group topics commonly include trauma therapy, grief and loss, anger management, self-esteem)
  • Activities of daily living skill building
  • Recreational therapy
  • Case management
  • Individual and family therapy/counseling
  • Referrals and linkage to outpatient support services including healthcare, housing, benefits, transportation, legal assistance, substance abuse support services, and vocational needs
  • Discharge or transition planning


 
Children’s Crisis Stabilization Program also known as the Children’s Inpatient Unit (CIU)
 
The children’s crisis stabilization unit provides continuous 24-hour observation and supervision for children’s seventeen (17) years of age and younger with an urgent/emergent needs who are a harm to themselves, a harm to others, or gravely disabled. The children’s crisis stabilization program provides crisis stabilization services in a safe, structured setting. The unit provides crisis interventions necessary to stabilize and restore the child to a level of functioning which requires a less restrictive level of care. 
 
 
Children’s Crisis Stabilization Program Offering:
  • Intake
  • Assessments and evaluations
  • Individualized treatment planning based on the individual’s strengths, needs, abilities, and preferences
  • Medication management (Prescriptions and monitoring)
  • Psycho-education/education on wellness and recovery (Education on the persons mental health issues and coping skills)
  • Group therapy (Group topics commonly include trauma therapy, grief and loss, anger management, self-esteem)
  • Activities of daily living skill building
  • Recreational therapy
  • Case management
  • Individual and family therapy/counseling
  • Referrals and linkage to outpatient support services including healthcare, housing, benefits, transportation, legal assistance, substance abuse support services, and vocational needs
  • Discharge or transition planning

The island’s organizational structure of its system of care is comprised of GBHWC (the single state agency of behavioral and wellness center), private and non-profit providers, as well as services provided by the military sector. In addition, GBHWC collaborates with public child-serving agencies such as Dept. of Education, Child Welfare, Dept. of Youth Affairs, Juvenile Probation Dept. and Dept. of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities (DISID), as well as private and non-profit providers.

 


Intake/Emergency Services:
 
This branch, comprised of 2 intake workers, provides screening interviews and mental status examination (psychiatric assessment) on every consumer coming into GBHWC. This is specialized social work requiring training and experience in the use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) of the American Psychiatric Association. Intake Workers must consult with the Clinical Administrator, staff psychiatrist to determine immediate treatment needs in crisis cases and formulate diagnostically based treatment recommendations for routine cases. Intake workers respond to telephone calls by persons immediately and make proper referrals within or outside GBHWC, including drug and alcohol evaluations. On a case-by-case basis, intake workers provide outreach intake services or emergency situations.


 

Outpatient Adult Counseling:

One (1) therapist trained in the area of individual, marriage, and family therapy staff the Adult Counseling Branch. As psychiatric social workers, they address the psychotherapy needs of Consumers who meet the diagnostic criteria within the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders of the American Psychiatric Association. In addition to providing therapy, the therapist provides consultations, referrals, and collaborations with agencies both in government and private sectors.



Day Treatment Services:
 

The Day Treatment Services (DTS), with 3 psychiatric technicians and a Support Services Supervisor (who supervises DTS, Guma IFIL, and Guma Hinemlo’), is a service under the Clinical Services Division. This program is designed to provide structured, therapeutic activities for the long-term, serious mentally ill adults. These includes those acute mentally ill adults still hospitalized at the Adult Inpatient Unit, and are in need of a less restrictive environment to assist in a smooth transition to home and community living. The primary objective of the DTS program is to promote and enhance the psycho-social, economic and physical well being of each consumer enrolled with the program. This is done through therapeutic group work, a primary focus of DTS, whereby the consumers are involved in a variety of activities such as social skills, arts and crafts, personal hygiene, independent living skills, recreational and work activities. In FY 2004, there were approximately 24 SMI adults who participate at DTS at any given time; in FY 2003, an average of 30 SMI adults participated at DTS at any given time.

 


 
Co-occurring Substance Abuse and Mental Disorders service:
 

The Mentally Ill Chemical Abuser (MICA) group commenced October 1, 1999. A chemical dependency treatment specialist facilitates the group with over 10 years experience in their respective fields. A Chemical Dependency Treatment Specialist runs the program from the Drug and Alcohol Branch.

The group focus is on education of substance abuse and mental illness. Components of twelve steps, recovery goals, relapse prevention, stress management, and education on psychotropic medications. Each group member is encouraged to attend self-help groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous.

The co-facilitators coordinate with the Consumers’ assigned social workers to eliminate barriers that prevented them from coming to the drug and alcohol group.


 

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